PDA

View Full Version : Chit Chat Watch out for this.



lkeeney
02-16-2008, 02:19 PM
I have only done a few model photo shoots with my E-3/battery grip. Today, I noticed that a bunch of my shots were way under exposed. I found the problem to be the adjustment wheel on the battery grip falls directly under my middle finger when taking photo on the portrait orientation. What was happening was I was moving the wheel as I moved my hand, thus changing the f stop.

This happened about six times while shooting 295 images during a 2 1/2 hour photo shoot.

Just something to be aware of. Is there some way to turn off this wheel's adjustments?

Lawrence

E B
02-16-2008, 02:51 PM
You can reassign different functions to the Main or Sub Dials (P. 91) but I'm not aware of any method to assign them no function at all. Perhaps your best option might be a small piece of electricians tape over the offending dial. It would be hardly noticeable. Another alternative would be to just remove the grip. It will make your camera lighter and easier to maneuver and you can still carry the extra battery in a pocket in case you run out of power.

lkeeney
02-16-2008, 04:08 PM
You can reassign different functions to the Main or Sub Dials (P. 91) but I'm not aware of any method to assign them no function at all. Perhaps your best option might be a small piece of electricians tape over the offending dial. It would be hardly noticeable. Another alternative would be to just remove the grip. It will make your camera lighter and easier to maneuver and you can still carry the extra battery in a pocket in case you run out of power.

I was wondering if you could reassign the grip know separately from the others, but I guess not.

I like the grip when shooting models because I shoot mostly in the portrait mode and the shutter release on the grip is a nice feature. I will probably go the tape route.

marcof
02-16-2008, 11:05 PM
here's a tip..

put the camera on a tripod and have the model move instead of yourself moving about.

then, use a wire remote to shoot. you don't have to look trough the viewfinder all the time, so contact with the model is more direct (no "wall" between you and the model) and you will get better results in the end because of this. and no chance of buttons or wheels screwing up your settings either 8)

lkeeney
02-16-2008, 11:29 PM
here's a tip..

put the camera on a tripod and have the model move instead of yourself moving about.

then, use a wire remote to shoot. you don't have to look trough the viewfinder all the time, so contact with the model is more direct (no "wall" between you and the model) and you will get better results in the end because of this. and no chance of buttons or wheels screwing up your settings either 8)

This is a good idea, but I think it would be really hard to keep the model in the frame unless I was willing to do a lot of cropping.

I could see doing this if I was just shooting portraits, but I am constantly changing from full length to 3/4 length to tight shots, depending on the pose the model is doing. I try to capture as many different looks as I can in the short time (1-2 hours) I have. I generally shoot about 100 shots per hour and give them as many different looks, angles, etc. as I can.

AbeakerZ
02-17-2008, 09:46 PM
I'm sorry to hear of your difficulties Lawrence. I know the frustration it can bring. As a left eye shooter I am constantly hitting the metering button with my nose on the E-510. It doesn't help that I'm an eyeglass wearer and am smashing my face into the camera to reduce incident light between my eye and the viewfinder.

I once shot a dragonfly not knowing I had accidentally switched to spot metering. Thankfully the area around him was supposed to be OOF so pulling down the EV in raw was acceptable.

I think you have your own answer as to the solution, you know it can happen so be aware of the viewfinder info. I still "nose" the metering button so I keep an eye out for it. A good heads up for people none the less.

Disabling a control wheel on the grip is an option but I'd personally hate to give up an available control. Heck, I'd just love to have a decent grip for the 510 or a control wheel on the 300 grip. It'd save some arthritis pain from contorting my hands around.