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View Full Version : Lens Topics Hand-holding Olympus 70-300



linzamin
04-03-2008, 02:47 PM
I'm considering buying this lens. I have an E-510 and would like to know the minimum shutter speed that must be used to get acceptably sharp photos. I know that there are a number of factors that would play into this. I have pretty steady hands and would rather not carry a tripod around. If those of you with the 70-300 could give me the typical shutter speeds you use at 300mm that would give me a starting point.

Hokuto
04-03-2008, 06:22 PM
There's no simple answer, since everyone shakes differently. The basic rule is 1/(fl x cf) [where fl=focal length and cf=conversion factor for the format; in fourthirds, that's "2"], so the formula would be 1/(fl x 2) ; that would mean 1/600 second when shooting at 300mm, but if you can get 2 stops back with IS, you might be able to shoot at 1/150 sec. That could work for some subjects/conditions/, and less well for others. The amount of camera shake visible also depends on the size you're enlarging to. You still won't go wrong with a tripod if you can haul it.

Blu-by-u
04-03-2008, 06:33 PM
That 70-300 is much lighter and smaller than any of the other zooms available for that range. I was using it for the F1 in Sepang Malaysia, it very hand holdable from 1/200 onwards. It is also very easy to pan with this lens for it's size and weight.

But some people may require a heavier lens for the stability.

bwenzel
04-03-2008, 06:55 PM
Maybe a monopod would be the way to go with this one. However, I know I have handheld shots at 1/100th of a second with my E500 and have turned out fine for prints up to 8x10.

RogerMac
04-03-2008, 07:10 PM
As has been said above it all depends. I have found that all the old tricks (lean against a tree, keep you elbows in etc) need to be relearnt but if you can do this then at 1/100, or even slower, there is no shake even when pixel peeping.

If on the other hand you (like me) stand in the middle of the garden craning upwards to photograph your local raptor in flight then at least 1/300 is recomended!

Thats all with IS on of course (E510)

wigpro
04-04-2008, 08:39 AM
Every shot and every person is different, so a "minimum" shutter speed is hard to project.


I have a 70-300 - every shot I have taken with the lens so far is hand held. I can honestly hand hold exposures as long as 1/8th of a second - if, I have something to lean against and I am on a real steady platform. Of course, I will take 6 or 8 shots, various ISO to assure that one or two of those shots are sharp. I can generally get it to work most of the time.

125 - 250 - all day long, even at full zoom.

I don't think you can go wrong with the 70-300. It is a great piece of glass for the price with a ton of reach, add in macro capabilities and for me it was a no-brainer.

Enjoy,

Jim

BL3
04-04-2008, 09:14 AM
If you're pondering a hand-holding technique, you really ought to view the "Youtube" video on the March 11 page of Joe McNally's "Blog:

http://www.joemcnally.com/blog/

The point he makes there reminds me of a martial artist finding his "center"; using the technique produces surprising results (at leasts for me). Good Luck, that 70-300 is a very cool lens.

Rocky

atlasman
04-04-2008, 01:11 PM
If you're pondering a hand-holding technique, you really ought to view the "Youtube" video on the March 11 page of Joe McNally's "Blog:

http://www.joemcnally.com/blog/

The point he makes there reminds me of a martial artist finding his "center"; using the technique produces surprising results (at leasts for me). Good Luck, that 70-300 is a very cool lens.

Rocky
I've been using a similar technique for years now and it gives me 2 stops of extra hand holdability.

timhughes666
04-04-2008, 01:47 PM
On my e500 most shots at 1/125 and above are sharp if I am in a good shooting posture under that it just depends!

On the e510 I guess from experience with a Sony H1 maybe 1/50 possible on a regular basis, I always aim for 1/100 - 1/125 as a minimum on that sort of focal length.

You will be able to handhold your E510 with is at 1/125 at 300mm without a problem . Aim for the highest shutter speeds for sure but you will manage much lower ones with practise.

Regards

Tim Hughes
http://www.artwanted.com/timhughes

ckrueger
04-07-2008, 10:39 AM
There is no magic number above which you'll get 100% sharp and below you'll get 100% blurry shots. The 1/(FL*crop) formula gets you a very high percentage of images sharp enough for all but the largest prints. IS can give you up to a few stops, but is inconsistent, so I wouldn't count on it but instead use it as an insurance policy. And of course you have to remember that ISO isn't free; bumping ISO to 800+ on the E-510 will reduce your dynamic range and lose detail in the noise. ISO1600 in particular on the E-510 will absolutely kill high-frequency details like hair or distant foliage.

Basically, keep the shutter speed as fast as you can with telephotos, no matter what. The lower you go, the more blur is likely to creep in, and the more blur you'll get. Stopping down your lens to get more sharpness won't help a bit if you introduce even a small amount of blur.

I'd aim for 1/1000 with your 70-300. Up the ISO to 400 and open the lens as necessary. If that's not enough, I'd go down to maybe 1/500sec, but shoot multiple frames for safety's sake. If that's not enough, bump ISO up to 800. If even that isn't enough, bump the ISO up to 1600, then slow the shutter down to maybe 1/250sec, and adjust your expectations, because your keeper rate and image quality is going to take a big hit. You'll basically be living and dying by IS at that point, and in my experience that means you'll get maybe 25% sharp photos, 50% OK photos, and 25% ugly photos.

When I'm shooting in extreme low light, I often use Tv mode set to the lowest speed I can get keepers at, crank the ISO all the way up, and shoot either in continuous mode firing tons of shots, or with mirror lockup if possible. It's a long shot to get good images, so stack the deck in your favor.

janwalker47
04-20-2008, 10:52 AM
I use the E-510 with the 50-200 lens and EC-20 doubler handheld. I've gotten sharp images at 1/50 and junk at 1/1000. My opinion is that focus technique is a far bigger issue than shutter speed. Doesn't matter what the shutter speed is if the camera isn't looking at the same thing you are.

Jan

srf4real
04-20-2008, 07:16 PM
With the 70-300 I go for 1/200 second or better to get crisp sharp images at full size. In macro at full zoom that threshold goes up, and I compensate as much as possible by ISO adjustment. The L1 is not IS and either is the lens, so only the lucky occasional good one results in an sharp image slower than that without motion blur of some sort... of course I tend to aim for fast moving subjects most of the time and 1/500 only barely freezes the action!