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Thread: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

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    Default Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    Focal length: 150mm
    Lens Construction: 11 Elements in 9 groups
    Angle of view: 8.2 degrees
    Closest focusing distance: 4.6 Ft.
    Max aperture: F2.0
    Min Aperture: F22
    Filter Size: 82mm
    Dimensions: 4D x 6L
    Weight: 3.39 lbs.
    Tele 1.4: Yes F2.8
    Ext Tube: Yes .31x mag
    Price:

    Olympus Website

    Support this site by ordering below:

    Attachment 4188Attachment 4284

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    Default Fourthirdsphoto review

    Coming at some point.

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    Default User Reviews:


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    Default Re:150mm F2.0

    Gee, I\'m lusting after this lens for quite some time now... Please comment on the AF speed and bokeh...

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    Default Re:150mm F2.0

    Pros:
    This is a super-sharp lens with virtually no optical problems. It has a wonderfully gorgeous bokeh that is extremely smooth. ("Bokeh" is the quality of the blur of the out-of-focus portion of an image.) It was awarded the "Best Hi-End Lens" award in 2004 by TIPA. It focuses very fast when good contrast is visible in the field of view (FOV). With a maximum aperture of f2.0 it is very bright and equally at home for low-light shooting or when a shallow depth of field (DOF) is desired.

    Since this is a big telephoto lens, the internal elements must move quite a distance to focus from near to far. As a result, two methods of limiting the auto focus (AF) are provided. First, there is a "Focus Limit Switch" which can limit the focus range to: infinity-4m or 4m-1.4m or it can be allowed to focus through its full range of infinity-1.4m. This is a great feature when you're shooting a low-contrast image or shooting in very low light and don't want the lens to "hunt" through its entire focusing range as the camera attempts to AF.

    Second, there are four "Focus Stop Buttons" around a front rubber collar (in front of the manual focus ring). Pressing any one of them will immediately freeze the AF at that point, fixing the focus. These buttons are most helpful when using continuous AF (C-AF) to shoot a moving subject.

    Although the lens is large and heavy, it isn't bad. When you consider that it has the same FOV as a 300mm lens on a 35mm film camera or a full-frame Canon 1Ds MkII or 5D, it is actually relatively light and compact. I find it very easy to use hand held. However, a person with underdeveloped muscles may find it a bit heavy to hold for very long. In that case, it includes a great tripod mount that can be rotated. The tripod mount is removable and most of the time I leave it in my bag.

    This is a "prime" lens. In other words, it has a fixed focal length unlike a "zoom" lens which has a variable focal length. This makes it smaller and lighter than a comparable zoom lens.

    The lens is built like a tank with a strong metal body. It is very rugged and fully weather/dust sealed. If you have a chance to see and handle one of them, you'll see that they exude "quality".

    This is an internal focusing lens so its outside dimensions are fixed---the length does not change as you adjust the focus. Also, the front of the lens does not rotate as you focus so a polarizer can be used.

    Other "pros" include a very nice lens hood which fits tightly so it won't fall off and a great padded lens case with shoulder strap (it's the same case that is provided with the ZD 50-200mm f2.8-3.5 ED lens).


    Cons:
    Focusing "hunts" when there is low contrast. Note: This is true of all 4/3rds lenses and probably stems more from the AF system of the camera rather than any deficit of the lens. However, it is more noticeable for a large lens if you allow it to hunt through its full focusing range.

    This is a "prime" lens (yes, I also listed this under the "Pros" section but for a different reason). The only way you can control the size of your subject in the FOV is to physically move the lens and camera closer to or farther away from the subject. Sometimes this isn't practical.


    Price Paid:
    US$1400 on eBay. As far as I'm aware, this was the first ZD 150mm f2.0 ED lens ever sold on eBay. Unbelievably, no one bid against me. Perhaps there were very few photographers who knew about the lens at the time---it had not been available for very long. By the way, B&H charges US$2200-2300. Occasionally Olympus offers a US$200 rebate.


    Other Info:
    This is my favorate ZD lens. I use it a lot when I need to shoot candids in low light and can't use a tripod. I also use it to shoot "pseudo" macros with the addition of the EC-14 teleconverter when the subject won't let me get very close. For example, I've shot many close-ups of dragonflies which I could never have shot with the ZD 50mm f2.0 ED macro prime because the critters would not have allowed me to get close enough.

    My wife shot the following photo of me (Autumn 2005) after I returned home from a morning shoot. I'm holding my E-1 and ZD 150mm f2.0 ED. Notice how large the lens looks when the hood is attached.

    Best regards, FL

    Pursuing excellence...

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    Default Re:150mm F2.0

    Greetings,

    I recently measured the performance of several legacy lenses on my E-1 and I wanted to compare them to a couple of really good ZD lenses. My best lens is my ZD 150mm f2.0 ED so I measured it to establish a baseline of how an exceptional lens would measure on my E-1. I also measured my ZD 50mm f2.0 macro lens. The ZD 150mm results follow...

    Measurements
    My measurements are based on the Imatest system (version 1.6.3). The lens was mounted on a tripod and located an appropriate distance away from each of several precision test targets. All tests were performed with my Olympus E-1 with an RM-CB1 remote shutter release cable. My E-1 is outfitted with a Katz Eye Optics split-prism focusing screen and an HLD-2 battery grip. The mirror was locked up (anti-shock mode) for each shot.

    Sharpness – The easiest way to measure the sharpness or resolution of a lens is with a camera. However, this makes the camera a part of the measurement. That means we are measuring the lens and camera together—the camera cannot be removed from the measurement. For this reason it would be best to use a camera whose image sensor has the highest available resolution. That's why PhotoZone uses an E-300 for its 4/3rds lens measurements. I don't have an E-300 or E-500 (both 8 megapixel cameras) so I used my trusty E-1 (a 5 megapixel camera). Therefore the values I measured will not be the highest possible.

    There are several measures of image sharpness and before we can compare results, we have to make sure that we use the same measure. I chose to measure MTF50 in lw/ph. The MTF50 is the "modulation transfer function" or spatial frequency where the contrast drops to half (50%) of its low-frequency value. I know that sounds technical and you don't need to understand it because as long as you read my tests, I'll always measure the same thing so we can compare "apples to apples". But readers of my tests should not compare my results to those of another tester unless they first make certain that they measured MTF50 also. As for "lw/ph", it is the units and it means line widths per picture height. Lw/ph is calculated as follows: lw/ph = 2 x lp/mm x picture height. Where lp/mm is the number of line pairs per millimeter and the picture height is also in millimeters. I won't bore you with any more technobabble. Suffice it to say that if you want to compare someone else's sharpness measurements to mine, they need to measure MTF50 in lw/ph using an E-1 camera. For more information about measurements, see Imatest.

    I measured the sharpness of the lens at each full f-stop. Here are the results:


    Notice that I made two measurements at each f-stop. First, I measured the sharpness in the center of the field of view (FOV). Second, I measured the sharpness in one of the corners of the FOV (I used the lower left corner). That way you can see whether a lens is sharper in the center or at a corner.

    Let's begin at the left end of the graph. Notice how flat the graph is. There is no drop-off at f2.0. This is amazing. Very few lenses hold their sharpness this well when the aperture is wide open. No wonder this lens has received such high praise.

    But what do the numbers mean in practical terms? An MTF50 less than 1000 lw/ph should be considered "bad" or "poor" because it will produce a very soft picture with low contrast. You need at least 1150 lw/ph before the picture begins to look "good" and I'd rather see 1450 lw/ph or more on an E-1.

    Now, let's move to the right end of the graph. All lenses, no matter how wonderful their design or glass, will begin to lose sharpness at small apertures (high f-stops) because of diffraction as the light passes through the small iris in the lens. So the roll-off that begins at about f11 and gets worse as the aperture closes to f22 is fairly normal and has nothing to do with the quality of the optics.

    Next, I wanted to see what, if any, effect a good UV filter would have on the sharpness. I repeated three of the measurements with a filter on. This is shown below:


    I keep a high-quality Hoya HMC Super UV(0) filter on each of my ZD lenses and it seems clear from these results that there is no harm to my pictures in doing so. By the way, I didn't expect there to be any problem but this has been a subject of hot debate at other websites and I wanted to be sure. Obviously, your results may vary with lesser filters. Nor would I infer from these results that all Hoya filters are this good. The HMC Super line is their best and claims a light transmission rating of 99.7%.

    Next, let's see what the Olympus Digital EC-14 1.4x teleconverter does to the sharpness. The following graph repeats all of the previous measurements with the EC-14 installed.


    A 1.4x teleconverter always shifts the aperture range of a lens up by one f-stop. That's why the aperture range is f2.8 to f32 when the EC-14 is installed. The next graph compares the lens with and without the EC-14 so you can more easily see the difference.


    I think the results are pretty clear: We can safely conclude that the EC-14 works extremely well with the ZD 150mm lens and you can expect pictures with excellent sharpness and contrast. If you're not getting good shots, it may be due to motion blur since the teleconverter boosts the focal length to 210mm and requires you to shoot at 1/400th second or faster if you shoot by hand. Or it could be due to a shallow depth of field (DOF).

    Chromatic Aberration (CA) – This test measures color fringing. I measured CA every time that I measured sharpness. The lens, by itself, stayed below 0.5 pixels which is considered "insignificant". When the EC-14 was added, the CA eased up to 0.6 pixels which is still very low. Overall, this lens appears to have no CA problems on my E-1.

    Distortion – This test measures whether or not parts of the image are bent, stretched or squished. An extreme example would be the barrel distortion that is common to some wide-angle lenses like a "fisheye" lens. To measure it, a grid pattern of equally spaced horizontal and vertical lines are photographed and measured. This lens is basically free of distorion by itself or when it is used with an EC-14 teleconverter. The highest deviation I measured was 0.734% which is small (less than 1%).

    Vignetting – This test measures the light drop-off near the corners of the picture. I used worse-case conditions with the lens focused to infinity. The lens exhibited very little vignetting by itself (no more than -0.331 f-stops) or with an EC-14 teleconverter (no more than -0.451 f-stops). These levels will drop even more when the lens is focused closer.

    These tests verify the superb quality of the ZD 150mm f2.0 ED lens and provide a very good baseline for what a super high-grade lens looks like when measured on an E-1. The wide-aperture performance is among the very best.

    Copyright © 2006 by Harris Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Best regards, FL

    Pursuing excellence...

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    Default Re: 150mm F2.0

    Thank you for such an in depth review of the lens. This is my "lust" lens.
    "A picture, like character, is developed in darkness"

    E-M5, E-3, E-5 + HLD-4, 8 Fisheye, 12-50mm, 17mm, 12-60mmSWD, 14-54mm, 50mm macro, 50-200mmSWD, FL-36R, FL-50, VA-1 & XZ-1.

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    Default Re: 150mm F2.0

    Thank's First Light.
    Wouldn't it be great to attatch this to a 10mp body.
    David

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    I bought this lens, refurbished, from Cameta for $1749 based mostly on FL's excellent posts, and I'm not in any way disappointed. It is indeed big, heavy, expensive, and achingly sharp and it finds its way onto my camera more often than I had originally intended. Focus speed with an E-1 and battery grip is lightning fast, but it suffers like all Oly lenses when subjected to low-contrast or fast moving subjects. I'll admit that I am still learning to manipulate the focus system limit switches, however, and the focus speed does indeed improve when the I get lucky with the switches. The lack of image stablization is really moot for me, because this lens/camera combination is heavy and begs for some kind of 'pod. Finally, as big as it is, I can still get it into my main camera bag (Think Tank Speed Racer) mounted and ready to shoot with only the hood reversed. This lens may be the quintessential candid portrait lens, but I can't wait to try some (aviation) air-to-air shots as well.

    Rocky

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    I endorse all the above comments. My favourite ZD lens too.
    To this I would add that I'm now using it on my E-330, and finding the more compact body no problem at all. The 150 is at least as easy to handle on the E-330 as on my E-1, though this is a personal thing.
    I'm looking forward to see how good the EC-20 convertor will be, because if the quality is anywhere near the figures First Light has produced with the EC-14, the 150mm+EC-20 would be a superb and compact combination for many purposes.
    Cheers,
    Don

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    I recently bought one of these used at auction. One of the things that really jumps out at me is how the image stabilization in my E-3 makes this lens easily hand-holdable. I did some (admittedly informal) tests and found that I could hand-hold the lens and achieve relatively sharp images at 1/30th of a second. By the old rule of thumb it should require at least a 1/300th shutter speed to hand-hold this lens, but the IS works like a charm. I took this at 1/30th wide open.



    Given the relatively compact size of the lens and the extraordinary effect of image stabilization on such a long focal length, I've pretty much decided that an E-3 with this lens attached is the single greatest combo for sporting events, concerts, plays and press conferences that's ever been available to photographers. I know that probably sounds a little (or a lot) bombastic, but being able to comfortably hand-hold a lens with this kind of reach is amazing. And of course it's an extremely fast and sharp lens that seems to be excellent wide open. Maybe I just have a crush, but I think this has finally surpassed my old Zuiko 90mm f/2 Macro as my favorite lens of all time.

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    Looked at this lens review again after staying away for a long time.

    Darnit, I still want one. But I want a 70mm f/2 lens like this even more.

    Godfrey

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    Quote Originally Posted by RRJackson View Post
    Given the relatively compact size of the lens and the extraordinary effect of image stabilization on such a long focal length, I've pretty much decided that an E-3 with this lens attached is the single greatest combo for sporting events, concerts, plays and press conferences that's ever been available to photographers. I know that probably sounds a little (or a lot) bombastic, but being able to comfortably hand-hold a lens with this kind of reach is amazing. And of course it's an extremely fast and sharp lens that seems to be excellent wide open. Maybe I just have a crush, but I think this has finally surpassed my old Zuiko 90mm f/2 Macro as my favorite lens of all time.
    That is a fantastic statement for this reader, given that my all time fav lens is the 90/2 macro also. Handholdable at 1/30 a second, you say? Simply outstanding. I have this lens on my Luxury (as opposed to Must Have!) list. Maybe I need to switch categories.
    Regards,
    J A P

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    Seeing the reviews of this from this page have even further complicated my decision for a first step into ZD glass.

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    I just got this lens today, I cannot believe how sharp it is. I did some very basic tests to measure the sharpness wide open with and w/o the EC14.

    Here are the ones with NO EC14.



    These with EC14.



    I did these tests with a clear filter on the lens, and examining the filter after, I realized that it looks like it's been hit with sandpaper The lens coating is good though I will have to redo these tests at a later time.
    Charles

    Canon cool aid, but soft spot for Oly :-D

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    Default Re: 150mm F2.0

    [quote=First Light;156177]Greetings,

    I recently measured the performance of several legacy lenses on my E-1 and I wanted to compare them to a couple of really good ZD lenses. My best lens is my ZD 150mm f2.0 ED so I measured it to establish a baseline of how an exceptional lens would measure on my E-1. I also measured my ZD 50mm f2.0 macro lens. The ZD 150mm results follow...

    Measurements
    My measurements are based on the Imatest system (version 1.6.3). The lens was mounted on a tripod and located an appropriate distance away from each of several precision test targets. All tests were performed with my Olympus E-1 with an RM-CB1 remote shutter release cable. My E-1 is outfitted with a Katz Eye Optics split-prism focusing screen and an HLD-2 battery grip. The mirror was locked up (anti-shock mode) for each shot.

    Sharpness – The easiest way to measure the sharpness or resolution of a lens is with a camera. However, this makes the camera a part of the measurement. That means we are measuring the lens and camera together—the camera cannot be removed from the measurement. For this reason it would be best to use a camera whose image sensor has the highest available resolution. That's why PhotoZone uses an E-300 for its 4/3rds lens measurements. I don't have an E-300 or E-500 (both 8 megapixel cameras) so I used my trusty E-1 (a 5 megapixel camera). Therefore the values I measured will not be the highest possible.

    There are several measures of image sharpness and before we can compare results, we have to make sure that we use the same measure. I chose to measure MTF50 in lw/ph. The MTF50 is the "modulation transfer function" or spatial frequency where the contrast drops to half (50%) of its low-frequency value. I know that sounds technical and you don't need to understand it because as long as you read my tests, I'll always measure the same thing so we can compare "apples to apples". But readers of my tests should not compare my results to those of another tester unless they first make certain that they measured MTF50 also. As for "lw/ph", it is the units and it means line widths per picture height. Lw/ph is calculated as follows: lw/ph = 2 x lp/mm x picture height. Where lp/mm is the number of line pairs per millimeter and the picture height is also in millimeters. I won't bore you with any more technobabble. Suffice it to say that if you want to compare someone else's sharpness measurements to mine, they need to measure MTF50 in lw/ph using an E-1 camera. For more information about measurements, see Imatest.

    I measured the sharpness of the lens at each full f-stop. Here are the results:


    Notice that I made two measurements at each f-stop. First, I measured the sharpness in the center of the field of view (FOV). Second, I measured the sharpness in one of the corners of the FOV (I used the lower left corner). That way you can see whether a lens is sharper in the center or at a corner.

    Let's begin at the left end of the graph. Notice how flat the graph is. There is no drop-off at f2.0. This is amazing. Very few lenses hold their sharpness this well when the aperture is wide open. No wonder this lens has received such high praise.

    But what do the numbers mean in practical terms? An MTF50 less than 1000 lw/ph should be considered "bad" or "poor" because it will produce a very soft picture with low contrast. You need at least 1150 lw/ph before the picture begins to look "good" and I'd rather see 1450 lw/ph or more on an E-1.

    Now, let's move to the right end of the graph. All lenses, no matter how wonderful their design or glass, will begin to lose sharpness at small apertures (high f-stops) because of diffraction as the light passes through the small iris in the lens. So the roll-off that begins at about f11 and gets worse as the aperture closes to f22 is fairly normal and has nothing to do with the quality of the optics.

    Next, I wanted to see what, if any, effect a good UV filter would have on the sharpness. I repeated three of the measurements with a filter on. This is shown below:


    I keep a high-quality Hoya HMC Super UV(0) filter on each of my ZD lenses and it seems clear from these results that there is no harm to my pictures in doing so. By the way, I didn't expect there to be any problem but this has been a subject of hot debate at other websites and I wanted to be sure. Obviously, your results may vary with lesser filters. Nor would I infer from these results that all Hoya filters are this good. The HMC Super line is their best and claims a light transmission rating of 99.7%.

    Next, let's see what the Olympus Digital EC-14 1.4x teleconverter does to the sharpness. The following graph repeats all of the previous measurements with the EC-14 installed.


    A 1.4x teleconverter always shifts the aperture range of a lens up by one f-stop. That's why the aperture range is f2.8 to f32 when the EC-14 is installed. The next graph compares the lens with and without the EC-14 so you can more easily see the difference.


    I think the results are pretty clear: We can safely conclude that the EC-14 works extremely well with the ZD 150mm lens and you can expect pictures with excellent sharpness and contrast. If you're not getting good shots, it may be due to motion blur since the teleconverter boosts the focal length to 210mm and requires you to shoot at 1/400th second or faster if you shoot by hand. Or it could be due to a shallow depth of field (DOF).

    Chromatic Aberration (CA) – This test measures color fringing. I measured CA every time that I measured sharpness. The lens, by itself, stayed below 0.5 pixels which is considered "insignificant". When the EC-14 was added, the CA eased up to 0.6 pixels which is still very low. Overall, this lens appears to have no CA problems on my E-1.

    Distortion – This test measures whether or not parts of the image are bent, stretched or squished. An extreme example would be the barrel distortion that is common to some wide-angle lenses like a "fisheye" lens. To measure it, a grid pattern of equally spaced horizontal and vertical lines are photographed and measured. This lens is basically free of distorion by itself or when it is used with an EC-14 teleconverter. The highest deviation I measured was 0.734% which is small (less than 1%).

    Vignetting – This test measures the light drop-off near the corners of the picture. I used worse-case conditions with the lens focused to infinity. The lens exhibited very little vignetting by itself (no more than -0.331 f-stops) or with an EC-14 teleconverter (no more than -0.451 f-stops). These levels will drop even more when the lens is focused closer.

    These tests verify the superb quality of the ZD 150mm f2.0 ED lens and provide a very good baseline for what a super high-grade lens looks like when measured on an E-1. The wide-aperture performance is among the very best.

    Copyright © 2006 by Harris Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved.[/quote

    Where's the graphs and photos?

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    Default Re: Zuiko Digital (Olympus) 150mm f2.0 -Super High Grade

    I purchased a used copy in March 2011. THis is one truly fantastic lens. My only caution is to TEST a used lens when u get it. My first copy was from one of the big boys in NYC and there was some problem with it - it was not as sharp as an old zoom! They took it back no questions asked and then one popped up at the other NYC big house. That was a keeper- probably my sharpest lens maybe EVER!

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