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Thread: Fort Laramie - The Captains' Quarters

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    Default Fort Laramie - The Captains' Quarters

    Planned as the Commanding Officer's quarters, this structure was divided into a duplex for company grade officers, usually captains, when the CO chose to remain in another new dwelling. It is furnished to its appearance in 1872. When a new officer was assigned to the post, he could “rank out of quarters” any officer junior to him, taking the house for himself. Judging by these quarters, life on the frontier wasn't quite as dramatically austere as is often portrayed in movies. You can see me capturing an image of one of the upstairs bedrooms as I face a mirror through the Plexiglas doorway. All images are captured with the E-3 and 14-35mm lens using natural lighting. EXIF data should be intact.

    Outside view of the building showing the privacy fence installed on the porch to separate the two front doors.

    A dining room on the ground level. Most rooms on the first floor had some type of cast iron stove that was used for heating in the winter. Rooms on the upper level did not have such stoves. I didn't look for them, but it was often the custom to put holes covered by iron gratings in the floors of the upper level to allow the heat from the ground floor stoves to rise through the gratings and provide some amount of heating to the upper level.

    This small room separated the dining room from the kitchen on the ground level. It appears to have been a pantry that housed dining associated crockery and supplies.

    A part of the ground level kitchen. There is considerably more out of the frame to the right but it was severely clouded by Plexiglas reflection and some bright light coming in from a door and windows in that direction.

    One of the upstairs bedrooms. I can be seen in the mirror capturing the image through the Plexiglass barrier in the doorway.

    Another upstairs beedroom.
    Last edited by E B; 09-22-2009 at 07:24 AM.
    Good shooting,
    English Bob

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    Default Re: Fort Laramie - The Captains' Quarters

    I haven't commented on all your Fort Laramie posts, but am enjoying them very much. An excellent job was done restoring and keeping the detail of life in the 1800s on the frontier.
    Diana

    "Art must always follow nature and never oppose it."

    http://www.resurrectionfarmphotography.com/
    (Website on hiatus until I am settled permanently once again)

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    Default Re: Fort Laramie - The Captains' Quarters

    Thank you. I'm glad you enjoy them. Might be a nice stopping point for you in some future trip into the west.
    Good shooting,
    English Bob

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    Default Re: Fort Laramie - The Captains' Quarters

    EB,
    Yes, back in the olden days "rank had its privileges" also, not only here but also in the officers barracks you posted. I am enjoying your series, your shots are very well done especially considering having to shoot thru Plexiglas.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Denny T
    E-410, E-510, 35 Macro, 50 f-2, 14-42 3.5-5.6, 14-54 2.8-3.5, 18-180 3.5-6.3, 40-150 4.0-5.6, 50-200 Non swd 2.8-3.5, 70-300 4.0-5.6, EC-14, FL-36R

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    Default Re: Fort Laramie - The Captains' Quarters

    Thank you. Glad you're enjoying some of this series. Actually, the images have required far more processing than I prefer. The Plexiglass limited my shooting to natural light in poorly lit rooms and also limited the angle/perspective I had to shoot from. As a result, I had to radically alter the geometry of the second and last images of this post to make them nearer to architectually correct. The Plexiglass reflections and glare required that I crop out a lot of interesting detail in the kitchen shot and the extremely low light in the third through the last images required major adjustments to the tone to improve the image lighting and that in turn created noise which I had to remove. I certainly understand why the caretakers of the site protect it as they do, but I could easily have lived without the additional photographic aggravation. I really prefer to get the shot right at the time I capture it and then do minimal post processing. I suspect that the average snapshot tourist will walk away from this site with some nice memories but with a lot of very poor photographs. On the other hand, this site can be seen by the more photographically astute as an interesting challenge for those who like to exercise their post processing skills.
    Last edited by E B; 09-22-2009 at 03:30 PM.
    Good shooting,
    English Bob

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