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Thread: I could use some help/information!

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by OCsurfrider View Post
    Altough there are many pen users with excellent information on this site, another good resource for your questions would be here;

    http://www.mu-43.com/forum.php
    I ordered it. Amazon had it! Thanks!

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    Wink Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by kenez View Post
    Although it hasn't been updated since the original EP-1, the Magic Lantern guide is excellent and most of the subjects covered would also be applicable to your camera.

    http://www.sterlingpublishing.com/ca...=9781600596711
    I found it on Amazon and ordered it. Thank you very much for the tip!

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    I am far from new to photography, but I am new to this format. There are a lot more differences than I was aware of and I keep tripping over them. I just got the second lens for my Pen E-PL1, the 40-150mm zoom. While I was aware that the "effective distance" for this format vs. slr was 2X, I did NOT know that effectively, F stops change too and that effectively, one will get the same DOF at F4 that one got in SLR at F8. Which explains a lot of fuzzy pictures that resulted from super slow shutter speeds when I was trying to work in what I thought was reasonably good light (bright, overcast) using aperture preferred at F8. I wound up with shutter speed as low as 1/8 sec., which even with IS is way below what I could even in my prime (many years ago!) hand hold.

    So now that I have this effectively very long and rather slow zoom, I have a strong feeling that there is more I don't know than I do know and I am not sure where to get the knowledge I need.

    I have been recently limited in my experimentation by being too sick to go out and do much, but hopefully that's a temporary issue. Is there a book? Books? Website? Someplace where essential basic information that explains the differences in the two systems in plain English is available? I live WAY out in the boonies, so the local library is not a big help. I think i donated most of their books myself.

    Suggestions? Information would be VERY VERY much appreciated! I have the Olympus PEN E-PL1 with the newer 14-42mm and now the 40-150. I hope that I get richer and can get just one really super Leica lens. Have my eye on the not-yet-available 25mm prime. Meanwhile, I have what I have. Oh, still waiting delivery of the VF-2 viewfinder.

    Best,

    Marilyn
    NO - there is no correction for shutter speed. F8 is F8 in terms of what ISO and shutter speed would be needed. i.e. Get a light meter. If it says scene should be ISO200, F5.6, 1/100sec, those settings will give the same exposure on an EPL2, a CanonEOS, a full frame Sony, a 35mm camera and a Hasselblad.

    The greater DoF should make telephoto shooting easier, not harder. Hand holding a 300mm equivalent lens is very hard, no matter what the sensor format, and it is especially hard at arms length so you can see an LCD. The VF will help a lot. But basically, if you want to shoot at 300mm and get sharp pictures, invest in a tripod.

    Regards,

    Alan

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    Cool Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    Thank you. VERY much. I am going to take your suggestion and aside from the setting to show metadata (really want to be able to see what the settings were when I took the shot or I'll never learn anything!) I think I currently have gone back to all the originals ... except for AF which I set for AF + MF because I like to be able to make a final adjustment. AF is right usually, but it has a strong preference for focusing on objects in the foreground and blurring backgrounds rather than blurring the foreground. This has been true with DSLRs too ... I think it's a design issue and the only way around it is manual focus. This only comes up if I'm shooting landscape.
    Bear in mind, the camera has no idea what is the main subject. It just finds the stuff with the greatest amount of vertical or horizontal contrast in the focus areas to lock on to.

    I never use multi-point focus on any camera I use except in rare cases, but manufacturers tend to turn it on by default (it is more for action shots where you want the camera to guess where the target is). I want to select what focus point I use. So I set single point focus, and I start with the focus point in the center. I have my E-P2 set up so that the arrow keys on the keypad immediately change the focus point. On the E-PL1, it appears you have to first hit the ... key (left arrow) first before you can select the focus point, which is similar to my E-3. Then I use the keypad to select which focus point. For example, when I'm shooting a single person in portrait mode, I tend to use the right most focus point when the camera is in landscape orientation (or topmost point in portrait orientation) and then position the AF point on the person's face.

    I generally will use 1/2 press of the shutter to make sure the camera focuses on what I want it to focus on.

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    I have one final question: I thought, from what I read, that the flash was supposed to pop up automatically, but it never has yet done so. I have to pop it up manually and THEN it will, if it deems it necessary, fire. Assuming I've left adequate reboot time for the flash to get back up to full power ... otherwise, I get some pretty interesting "half" shots where it seems the flash either fired way too late, or only partially ... literally half the image will be dark and the other, light. Never seen that before on any camera. Usually the flash either fires, fires at less than full strength, or doesn't fire, but never have a seen this half of the frame lit and the other dark. If I could predict it, might make some interesting portraits, but as it is, it isn't predictable. Just wondering if you or someone else knows what that is ... I suspect late firing of the flash? Slow synch? I haven't touched the flash settings at all, so whatever it is, it's built into the camera's physics.
    I don't know the E-PL1 that well, as I've only used it at the Hunts and Olympus Photo Safari in 2010, but in general there are two things at play. If you are in iauto mode, the flash will likely pop-up when the camera thinks it needs it. If you are in Manual, Shutter Priority, or Aperture Priority modes, the camera figures you know what you are doing and doesn't pop it up. I don't recall what it does in Program mode.

    The second thing is to set the flash mode from auto (camera will only use flash when it thinks it needs it) to always fire mode (symbol is a lightning bolt). Then the flash will always fire. Since I always pop-up the flash on the E-3 when I want to use the flash (on E-P2, it doesn't have a pop-up flash, so it isn't an issue), I use the always fire flash mode as my default.

    In terms of the Photo safari, since you are in Mass. Hunts in conjunction with each of the camera vendors and the Essex National Heritage Association, holds a photo safari where they bring in a pro (note, they have different days for each manufacturer), have all of the sales and support staff on hand, and you can rent whatever camera is the current camera -- in 2010, I tried the E-PL1, in 2011, I tried the E-PL2 -- unfortunately, it is in the May-June time frame.

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    I suppose I am hands on. Even when I wrote the manuals (HUNDREDS of them), I had to get my hands ON the software I was writing about. I did not entirely trust engineering specs or QA. I have a good grip on what people need to know and how to make it easy to find info, so I had know how it would be used before I could make sense of an application. My process was always use it, learn it, break it if I could (that's how you find bugs), THEN document it. No one does that any more. It's not cost effective.
    As I said, a lot of people are that way.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Baxter View Post
    NO - there is no correction for shutter speed. F8 is F8 in terms of what ISO and shutter speed would be needed. i.e. Get a light meter. If it says scene should be ISO200, F5.6, 1/100sec, those settings will give the same exposure on an EPL2, a CanonEOS, a full frame Sony, a 35mm camera and a Hasselblad.

    The greater DoF should make telephoto shooting easier, not harder. Hand holding a 300mm equivalent lens is very hard, no matter what the sensor format, and it is especially hard at arms length so you can see an LCD. The VF will help a lot. But basically, if you want to shoot at 300mm and get sharp pictures, in a tripod.

    Regards,

    Alan
    I got this misinformation from a self styled expert. It sounded a bit weird, but I'm getting used to weird. Glad it isn't true because although I understand that the 2X factor in the Olympus is not a real optical change ... it is apparent, or perhaps even virtual, but not "real," I would hate to have to rethink aperture too. Used to be you needed to know 3 things: what is your film speed (ISO now), what aperture gets you what you want, and what shutter speed that you can you hand hold will enable the aperture you prefer and if not, what's your best compromise.

    The rest was between you and your eyeballs and of course, my faithful Weston Master V that I STILL miss. I was actually much happier before all the automation, but I am not going back to film. We used to say "film is cheap" to encourage newbies to shoot a lot. But as time went on and I no longer had my own darkroom and development facilities, film was NOT cheap.

    I'm happy to have a handful of flash cards and a big HD to keep my pictures. I don't print much anymore... lack of wall space, not lack of ambition.

    And I love this camera, but there are things about it that are puzzling. I will eventually work my way through the quirks and the kinks, mine and the camera's, but I some of the stuff I keep bumping into just makes no logical sense. Why the camera won't raise the ISO rather than lowering the shutter speed so much? Why do manual settings carry into automatic modes? Why are the explanations of what various settings do so vague and unhelpful? I'll get past it, but I think it ought to be easier. A better written manual would have been a great place to start!
    Last edited by teepee12; 09-05-2011 at 05:58 PM. Reason: typos

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meissner View Post
    It depends on what lens you had on the Canon, what ISO you had the camera at, what metering mode you had the camera in. Also, note the human eye can see at extremes more than the camera can.

    For example, if you had the Canon on auto ISO, and the Olympus on a fixed ISO, the Canon would be able to take the picture in much worse light. Or perhaps you had the Olympus in spot meter mode pointed at something dark.

    Have you read the first part of the manual where it goes over the basic camera operation? It sounds like you are just picking up the camera and expecting the defaults to be the same as your previous cameras. Maybe you've read the manual cover to cover, but it doesn't sound that way.

    We really can't help you without more concrete information, such as a picture with full EXIF information, so that we can tell what mode you were in.

    When you are shooting, hit the info button several times until you come to a screen that overlays what shutter speed and aperture will be used. That way you can see what settings will be used. My one complaint is for many Olympus bodies, the auto ISO is not displayed before you take the picture.
    Didn't know that hitting the info button would do that. Great news, that. Thank you.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meissner View Post
    One thing that throws a monkey wrench into this is Live View Boost (page 74). If you are wanting to set the camera to manual mode and adjust things until they look exposed, you want live view boost set to off (which is the default). The only time I could imagine wanting to use live view boost is when I'm shooting in dark conditions, and will be using a flash, but using boost would allow me to have the LCD (or VF-2) enhance the light so that I can frame the shot, and later the flash will provide the illumination.

    The rest of this is to the original poster and not xwingkiller:

    It may be a useful exercise to reset all of the settings to the factory defaults. You may have set some default by accident, and that may be adding to your problems. Then start with the camera in Program mode (not, iAuto, Aperture priority mode, etc.) and take pictures. Get comfortable with the camera, and let it make the metering decisions. Once you've gotten past this step, then you can go to aperture priority or other modes. It sounds like you are trying to get everything all at once. In Program mode, you can experiment with things like metering, ISO, etc. and the camera will honor those, while in iAuto, it will likely try to override things. Be sure to experiment with only one option at a time.

    In general, there are two types of people when it comes to learning. There are people who can learn by digesting a manual and there are people who learn by doing. Both are normal, and if you are in the second category, do it as small steps in terms of experiments. In general, I find whenever I try to do several things at once, it usually goes wrong. I don't recall where you live, but maybe there is somebody local who can help you through the process.

    Note that many of the people responding have been using Olympus for a while, and we might forget some of the nuances that we encountered when we first got an Olympus camera (I'm coming up on 10 years using various Olympus cameras).

    I can't help you with your problems under Windows 7, as I use Linux. I do use the camera to upload images all of the time. I suspect for Windows 7, it may be that you will have to load Viewer 2 or id to load your images. However, another possibility is maybe it's the particular USB port. Often times there is the suggestion that if you are having problems, plug the USB cable directly into the computer, and don't use a USB hub, since it eliminates some variables. Also try different USB ports on the computer, particularly if you have multiple USB cards in the computer. Before I set the default to Storage, I recall that the camera would pop-up a menu item on the LCD asking what mode I want to use. Maybe you had the back facing elsewhere and didn't see the menu (been there, done that).
    Funny about the USB hub. Usually works just fine. Then sometimes, for no particular reason, it doesn't. I'll try a direct plug in.

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    Cool Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    Didn't know that hitting the info button would do that. Great news, that. Thank you.
    Note, there are different modes when you are shooting, and when you review the pictures.

    According to page 33 of the manual, the modes available during shooting are:

    • Image only
    • Information display on
    • Histogram display
    • Multi-view display
    • Blinking highlight and shadow display
    • If you enable it, there is an additional mode to display the grid that you select in the options.

    According to page 61 of the manual, the modes available during review are:

    • Image only
    • Simplified display
    • Overall display with 4 separate histograms for R, G, B and luminence
    • Light box display
    • Highlight and shadow display
    • Histogram display

    If you go into review mode, and select a different screen, the camera will use this mode when showing you the review of the shot you just took.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by nickthetasmaniac View Post
    I very much doubt it will be the lens. Having changed cameras far too many times, one thing I've noticed is that different bodies, and especially different brands, go about the whole job of taking pictures quite differently.

    For instance, my E-3 always tried to boost exposures in low-light. It also avoided raising the ISO until it absolutely had too...

    My GH2 always exposes for the highlights and therefore often under-exposes the rest of the scene. It also likes to keep shutter speeds fast and therefore often boosts ISO and uses the widest aperture.

    My K20D always exposed for the centre of the composition, even when in matrix metering...

    And so on and so forth...

    So first, you need to get comfortable with the set-up of your camera (Olympus and Panasonic manuals are notoriously bad, so asking here is a good alternative).

    Second, get used to the way your camera meters and exposes. The best way to do this is simply trial and error - shoots lots of photos in different conditions and pay attention to what happens
    Of all the posts I've gotten (and I thank everyone for at least trying to help!), this is THE most helpful. I had one camera for a long time and I do remember that I had to "learn it" and it took a while, but after that, had it for a lot of years until it just up and died. The changeover had been hard. Even though I had often yearned for the flexibility of DSLR and was very interested from the start in the 4/3 system (and I have a long and positive history with Olympus which is why I chose it), it is still a lot of changes and a lot of learning in a pretty concentrated time period. I got not one, but two new systems almost simultaneously ... the Canon T3, with which I am having a much easier time, and the Olympus PL1 which is much trickier. Taking on too much too fast is an old problem for me and probably I need to slow down and take things one at a time. Back to enjoying taking pictures would be a fine start. Thank you again.

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    Post Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meissner View Post
    Note, there are different modes when you are shooting, and when you review the pictures.

    According to page 33 of the manual, the modes available during shooting are:

    • Image only
    • Information display on
    • Histogram display
    • Multi-view display
    • Blinking highlight and shadow display
    • If you enable it, there is an additional mode to display the grid that you select in the options.

    According to page 61 of the manual, the modes available during review are:

    • Image only
    • Simplified display
    • Overall display with 4 separate histograms for R, G, B and luminence
    • Light box display
    • Highlight and shadow display
    • Histogram display

    If you go into review mode, and select a different screen, the camera will use this mode when showing you the review of the shot you just took.

    I finally found it (info display during image display). Already doped out display info modes, though I find it hard to get useful info from the crowded LCD screen. Data is useful, the rest is just clutter.

    I have a similar problem with the info display during shooting, but this problem may be alleviated when I get my viewfinder.
    Last edited by teepee12; 09-05-2011 at 07:53 PM. Reason: rewrite and ???

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    Why the camera won't raise the ISO rather than lowering the shutter speed so much?
    These cameras prioritize image quality, and bumping up the ISO does nothing but degrade image quality. If you want a specific shutter speed, then use Shutter Priority (aka Tv mode on Canon systems). This will retain your shutter speed by opening the aperture as much as needed first, then bumping the ISO only after reaching maximum lens speed (assuming you're using Auto ISO). Again, to retain the best image quality. If you are using Aperture Priority (aka Av mode on Canon systems), then you must watch the shutter speed as it could go as slow as necessary to capture the correct exposure.

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    Why do manual settings carry into automatic modes?
    Which manual settings do you mean? These cameras are tools and not toys, so even in Auto and Program modes the goal is to give you as much control as possible.


    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    Why are the explanations of what various settings do so vague and unhelpful? I'll get past it, but I think it ought to be easier. A better written manual would have been a great 4to start!
    I guess that's what we're here for, lol.
    Olympus E-3 | Olympus E-PL2 PEN | Olympus E-PM1 PEN | Zuiko ED 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD | Zuiko 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5 | Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 Macro | Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/2.8 | Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.4 | Konica Hexanon 85mm f/1.8 | G.Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 | Zuiko 35mm f/3.5 Macro | Zuiko 25mm f/2.8 | KMZ Jupiter-3 50mm f/1.5 | E.Zuiko 200mm f/4 | Zuiko 75-150mm f/4 | Olympus EC-14 teleconverter | VF-2 and VF-3 Viewfinders | EMA-1 Mic Adapter | Olympus FL-36R and FL-50R speedlights

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    [/quote]I guess that's what we're here for, lol. [/QUOTE]

    I guess so

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neddog View Post
    These cameras prioritize image quality, and bumping up the ISO does nothing but degrade image quality. If you want a specific shutter speed, then use Shutter Priority (aka Tv mode on Canon systems). This will retain your shutter speed by opening the aperture as much as needed first, then bumping the ISO only after reaching maximum lens speed (assuming you're using Auto ISO). Again, to retain the best image quality. If you are using Aperture Priority (aka Av mode on Canon systems), then you must watch the shutter speed as it could go as slow as necessary to capture the correct exposure.



    Which manual settings do you mean? These cameras are tools and not toys, so even in Auto and Program modes the goal is to give you as much control as possible.




    I guess that's what we're here for, lol.
    This is actually useful! Thanks!

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    Exclamation Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neddog View Post
    These cameras prioritize image quality, and bumping up the ISO does nothing but degrade image quality. If you want a specific shutter speed, then use Shutter Priority (aka Tv mode on Canon systems). This will retain your shutter speed by opening the aperture as much as needed first, then bumping the ISO only after reaching maximum lens speed (assuming you're using Auto ISO). Again, to retain the best image quality. If you are using Aperture Priority (aka Av mode on Canon systems), then you must watch the shutter speed as it could go as slow as necessary to capture the correct exposure.



    Which manual settings do you mean? These cameras are tools and not toys, so even in Auto and Program modes the goal is to give you as much control as possible.




    I guess that's what we're here for, lol.
    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    This is actually useful! Thanks!
    Specifically: setting the ISO to anything other than Auto will prevent the camera from adjusting ISO in ANY mode. My Canon isn't a toy, but if you set ISO in one mode, it doesn't automatically carry over into e.g. Automatic, which is important when you shoot quickly. I used to in set things differently by mode so I could switch from mode to mode and activate various settings. That's not, I think, a matter of "toyness," but a matter of design intent.

    I didn't want to make a decision about what ISO to use for ALL pictures under ALL conditions. I just want to set it for one shooting mode. But I can't do that. So I will leave it on auto because anything else requires too much diddling and distracts me from my ultimate goal: taking pictures. I will get used to it. I will miss the flexibility of being able to set up P at one ISO but use i A in Auto ISO, etc. It was a great convenience having various setting in each mode. All Canons (this is my 4th) have worked this way and I assumed ... wrongly ... that this was standard. Apparently there IS no standard: each system does it its own way. I shouldn't be surprised. I got used to one system and switching is harder than expected.
    Last edited by teepee12; 09-05-2011 at 08:09 PM. Reason: typos again

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    Cool Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    I finally found it (info display during image display). Already doped out display info modes, though I find it hard to get useful info from the crowded LCD screen. Data is useful, the rest is just clutter.

    I have a similar problem with the info display during shooting, but this problem may be alleviated when I get my viewfinder.
    Of course in terms of clutter, it depends on whether you need the particular information being displayed.

    Note, the VF-2 is sharper, but my major problem with it is being able to see it when I'm wearing polarized sunglasses and shooting in landscape mode.

    Just to be clear, the VF-2 and VF-3 doesn't display any additional information over the LCD. It is exactly what you see in the LCD.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    To whoever said I should invest in a tripod: I did that. NOW I have to actually USE the tripod.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meissner View Post
    Of course in terms of clutter, it depends on whether you need the particular information being displayed.

    Note, the VF-2 is sharper, but my major problem with it is being able to see it when I'm wearing polarized sunglasses and shooting in landscape mode.

    Just to be clear, the VF-2 and VF-3 doesn't display any additional information over the LCD. It is exactly what you see in the LCD.
    I'll have to cope. I wear glasses too ... sunglasses and regular glasses ... and the reflections from them don't help the problem. I actually tried switching to contacts in the hope that this would help, but turns out I can't wear them. Bummer.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    This is actually useful! Thanks!
    No problem... Out of curiosity, I also decided to check just how slow my E-PL2 will go on Auto ISO in Av mode before bumping up the ISO to retain shutter speed. It will only go as slow as 1/60th of a second, before it starts bumping ISO.

    That's actually quite fast, in my books. I often shoot hand-held at under 1/10th of a second with decent results, and my default Shutter Priority setting is 1/20th of a second, as a "safe zone". The In-Body Image Stabilization of my Olympus cameras really help to make possible, as well as the greater DOF without sacrificing lens speed. On most other systems I could never get such good results with such slow shutter speeds. I did better on my Four-Thirds DSLRs than I do with my Micro Four-Thirds mirrorless bodies, but that's neither here nor there.
    Olympus E-3 | Olympus E-PL2 PEN | Olympus E-PM1 PEN | Zuiko ED 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD | Zuiko 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5 | Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 Macro | Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/2.8 | Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.4 | Konica Hexanon 85mm f/1.8 | G.Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 | Zuiko 35mm f/3.5 Macro | Zuiko 25mm f/2.8 | KMZ Jupiter-3 50mm f/1.5 | E.Zuiko 200mm f/4 | Zuiko 75-150mm f/4 | Olympus EC-14 teleconverter | VF-2 and VF-3 Viewfinders | EMA-1 Mic Adapter | Olympus FL-36R and FL-50R speedlights

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meissner View Post
    Bear in mind, the camera has no idea what is the main subject. It just finds the stuff with the greatest amount of vertical or horizontal contrast in the focus areas to lock on to.

    I never use multi-point focus on any camera I use except in rare cases, but manufacturers tend to turn it on by default (it is more for action shots where you want the camera to guess where the target is). I want to select what focus point I use. So I set single point focus, and I start with the focus point in the center. I have my E-P2 set up so that the arrow keys on the keypad immediately change the focus point. On the E-PL1, it appears you have to first hit the ... key (left arrow) first before you can select the focus point, which is similar to my E-3. Then I use the keypad to select which focus point. For example, when I'm shooting a single person in portrait mode, I tend to use the right most focus point when the camera is in landscape orientation (or topmost point in portrait orientation) and then position the AF point on the person's face.

    I generally will use 1/2 press of the shutter to make sure the camera focuses on what I want it to focus on.


    I don't know the E-PL1 that well, as I've only used it at the Hunts and Olympus Photo Safari in 2010, but in general there are two things at play. If you are in iauto mode, the flash will likely pop-up when the camera thinks it needs it. If you are in Manual, Shutter Priority, or Aperture Priority modes, the camera figures you know what you are doing and doesn't pop it up. I don't recall what it does in Program mode.

    The second thing is to set the flash mode from auto (camera will only use flash when it thinks it needs it) to always fire mode (symbol is a lightning bolt). Then the flash will always fire. Since I always pop-up the flash on the E-3 when I want to use the flash (on E-P2, it doesn't have a pop-up flash, so it isn't an issue), I use the always fire flash mode as my default.

    In terms of the Photo safari, since you are in Mass. Hunts in conjunction with each of the camera vendors and the Essex National Heritage Association, holds a photo safari where they bring in a pro (note, they have different days for each manufacturer), have all of the sales and support staff on hand, and you can rent whatever camera is the current camera -- in 2010, I tried the E-PL1, in 2011, I tried the E-PL2 -- unfortunately, it is in the May-June time frame.


    As I said, a lot of people are that way.
    Dollar short and a day late. Maybe next year.

    I reset to centerweighted metering which is what I usually prefer and single point AF. Hopefully, I'll like the results, but I can always change them back.

    I'll pop up the flash if I need it. I rare use it normally ... more now because I'm running test shots indoors and I have no choice.

    I have learned an incredible amount in a really short time. It's taken a lot of input from a lot of people, but I actually got the answers I was looking for pretty much. A bit scattershot, but I kind of know the essential principles of photography and cameras, so I'm a pretty fast learner. If I'm feeling a little better tomorrow and the weather is kind, I might be able to get out and actually shoot something other than my doll collection! i did get some cool shots of my very old dolls.
    Last edited by teepee12; 09-05-2011 at 09:05 PM.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    Specifically: setting the ISO to anything other than Auto will prevent the camera from adjusting ISO in ANY mode. My Canon isn't a toy, but if you set ISO in one mode, it doesn't automatically carry over into e.g. Automatic, which is important when you shoot quickly. I used to in set things differently by mode so I could switch from mode to mode and activate various settings. That's not, I think, a matter of "toyness," but a matter of design intent.

    I didn't want to make a decision about what ISO to use for ALL pictures under ALL conditions. I just want to set it for one shooting mode. But I can't do that.
    If you use the MySet function, it will save different settings for all modes.
    Olympus E-3 | Olympus E-PL2 PEN | Olympus E-PM1 PEN | Zuiko ED 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD | Zuiko 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5 | Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 Macro | Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/2.8 | Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.4 | Konica Hexanon 85mm f/1.8 | G.Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 | Zuiko 35mm f/3.5 Macro | Zuiko 25mm f/2.8 | KMZ Jupiter-3 50mm f/1.5 | E.Zuiko 200mm f/4 | Zuiko 75-150mm f/4 | Olympus EC-14 teleconverter | VF-2 and VF-3 Viewfinders | EMA-1 Mic Adapter | Olympus FL-36R and FL-50R speedlights

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neddog View Post
    If you use the MySet function, it will save different settings for all modes.
    I will have to investigate that.

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    Cool Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by teepee12 View Post
    I'll have to cope. I wear glasses too ... sunglasses and regular glasses ... and the reflections from them don't help the problem. I actually tried switching to contacts in the hope that this would help, but turns out I can't wear them. Bummer.
    Besides the VF-2/VF-3, there are other options to see the screen in bright sun. You can get various loupes that fit over the screen and allow you to put your eye up to lens. The one I own is the clearviewer (from clearviewer.com). I posted a review here in the review section. There are times when I use it, and times when I don't (the main issue is when I'm shooting single handed because I have something in the other hand).

    Another option is the Hoodman loupe, which is kind of clunky.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Meissner View Post
    Besides the VF-2/VF-3, there are other options to see the screen in bright sun. You can get various loupes that fit over the screen and allow you to put your eye up to lens. The one I own is the clearviewer (from clearviewer.com). I posted a review here in the review section. There are times when I use it, and times when I don't (the main issue is when I'm shooting single handed because I have something in the other hand).

    Another option is the Hoodman loupe, which is kind of clunky.
    You're a night owl too, aintcha! Believe it or not, I think I have a loupe. More than one, actually. Used to run an antique store, so I had several. Specialized in ancient Chinese porcelain which required a whole lot of really close looking. Never thought to use them in photography. Don't know if they are the right type of loupe. But I can try.

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neddog View Post
    No problem... Out of curiosity, I also decided to check just how slow my E-PL2 will go on Auto ISO in Av mode before bumping up the ISO to retain shutter speed. It will only go as slow as 1/60th of a second, before it starts bumping ISO.

    That's actually quite fast, in my books. I often shoot hand-held at under 1/10th of a second with decent results, and my default Shutter Priority setting is 1/20th of a second, as a "safe zone". The In-Body Image Stabilization of my Olympus cameras really help to make possible, as well as the greater DOF without sacrificing lens speed. On most other systems I could never get such good results with such slow shutter speeds. I did better on my Four-Thirds DSLRs than I do with my Micro Four-Thirds mirrorless bodies, but that's neither here nor there.
    Well, YOU are steady! Wish I were equally, but am not not and never was! Nope, not even with IS! But God bless you... I'm sure those super steady heads will get you far and I am not just saying that. Surgery maybe??

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    Default Re: I could use some help/information!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neddog View Post
    No problem... Out of curiosity, I also decided to check just how slow my E-PL2 will go on Auto ISO in Av mode before bumping up the ISO to retain shutter speed. It will only go as slow as 1/60th of a second, before it starts bumping ISO.

    That's actually quite fast, in my books. I often shoot hand-held at under 1/10th of a second with decent results, and my default Shutter Priority setting is 1/20th of a second, as a "safe zone". The In-Body Image Stabilization of my Olympus cameras really help to make possible, as well as the greater DOF without sacrificing lens speed. On most other systems I could never get such good results with such slow shutter speeds. I did better on my Four-Thirds DSLRs than I do with my Micro Four-Thirds mirrorless bodies, but that's neither here nor there.
    Interesting. Mine went all the way to 1/8, which for me was way too slow. I've changed a number of settings now, including the way it meters light (centre weighted, single measuring point) and ISO is now set to Auto across the boards because life will be easier that way. Since I have an automated camera, I might as well let it do its thing the way the designers intended. Clearly what I want isn't working out so well!

    I did manage to take a rather nifty set of pictures (indoors, using flash, something I do very rarely) of my Old Dolls collection (mostly from the 1930s through mid 1950s). They deserve the attention and it was good practice working with the flash that I otherwise will pretty much never use. I am not sure it is working the way it's supposed to. Fine when it actually fires and fires WHEN it ought to, but often either fails to fire or fires late, leaving half the frame dark. Not sure what to make of this. And it will NEVER pop up on its own in any mode or any lighting situation. It is supposed to, but it doesn't. That probably IS a problem with the camera, but I haven't the energy to send the whole thing back for this, especially since all I have to do to eliminate the problem is pop it up manually.

    But when it does work, it's excellent for close in work like of this type.

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