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Thread: What's in your portrait bag?

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    Default What's in your portrait bag?

    I shoot my first portrait session this weekend, no paying I owe you a big favor session. But it went real well. The parents were extremely pleased. I went out armed with a big camera, nice glass. wireless flash trigger, tripod and one of those circular reflector diffuser things.
    I watched a couple of Youtube videos to learn a couple of techniques. So I am asking " What do you carry in the field? What is your basic set up and do you have a how to video you can share with me? "
    Even though I am not getting paid for this, What do you charge for a two hour shooting and then PhotoShoped prints/files afterwards. I was thinking if I charged $50.00 an hour for the session and $10-20.00 for the edited file. Am I close? Seems like the going rate where I live. Unless I get good and hit the big time.
    For off camera flash I read expose for the background, shoot the flash in manual and adjust it up or down until good results are had??? It seemed to work. I would share a picture but I shoot full frame/ non Olympus.


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    Default Re: What's in your portrait bag?

    Wish I could help, but I'm learning with hard knocks as well. I just shot my first wedding, (actually helped my daughter shoot her first wedding) it went very well. I used my 12-60, 35-100, and very sparingly my 7-14. 90% of my portrait and wedding shots were with the 35-100, indoors was all 12-60. She went with a newly acquired 9-18, 14-54 and 70-200.

    It was outdoors, all natural light. Seven hours on site, post processing yet to be accomplished. She made $500.00.
    Not too bad as we are both learning.

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    Default Re: What's in your portrait bag?

    Quote Originally Posted by cosmonaut View Post
    So I am asking " What do you carry in the field? What is your basic set up and do you have a how to video you can share with me? "
    No video.

    Basic setup includes four light stands, flash bracket, 5-6 speedlights, 5 small softboxes, 2 umbrellas, two flags on lightstand clamps, tripod, stool, triggers, 10' paper roll, background stands, Zuiko 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5, Zuiko 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5, Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.4, Zuiko 50mm f/1.4, Zeiss 135mm f/2.8, and a few camera bodies.

    I generally light from both sides and the front. For full-body I light the legs as well as the head on each side. For high key I light behind the model from both sides. Light ratios are generally around 2:1 for sides:front, or for high key about 2:3 for front/sides:behind.
    Last edited by Neddog; 06-24-2012 at 11:46 PM.
    Olympus E-3 | Olympus E-PL2 PEN | Olympus E-PM1 PEN | Zuiko ED 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD | Zuiko 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5 | Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 Macro | Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/2.8 | Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.4 | Konica Hexanon 85mm f/1.8 | G.Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 | Zuiko 35mm f/3.5 Macro | Zuiko 25mm f/2.8 | KMZ Jupiter-3 50mm f/1.5 | E.Zuiko 200mm f/4 | Zuiko 75-150mm f/4 | Olympus EC-14 teleconverter | VF-2 and VF-3 Viewfinders | EMA-1 Mic Adapter | Olympus FL-36R and FL-50R speedlights

    cyclopsphoto.ca

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    Default Re: What's in your portrait bag?

    What's in my bag (which is a small backpack)? Back up stuff...an extra body, an extra flash unit, an extra lens....plus batteries, memory cards, lens cleaner.....What's in my hands is a body, lens and a flash, on a bracket. That's my go to rig when I'm out doing natural setting portrait photogaphy. Yea,it would be nice to have the flash off camera, but with generally windy conditions and without an assistant, and moving around a lot from one setting to another in any given location, being able to move here and there quickly is a plus. The results may not be stellar, but they are quite good.
    "The mind is its own place and in itself, can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven" - John Milton, Paradise Lost
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    Default Re: What's in your portrait bag?

    Quote Originally Posted by kenwae View Post
    What's in my bag (which is a small backpack)? Back up stuff...an extra body, an extra flash unit, an extra lens....plus batteries, memory cards, lens cleaner.....What's in my hands is a body, lens and a flash, on a bracket. That's my go to rig when I'm out doing natural setting portrait photogaphy. Yea,it would be nice to have the flash off camera, but with generally windy conditions and without an assistant, and moving around a lot from one setting to another in any given location, being able to move here and there quickly is a plus. The results may not be stellar, but they are quite good.
    How well does the brakett do in getting the flash off camera enough? What brand, model, do you use? My guess is you use a cord?


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    Default Re: What's in your portrait bag?

    I use the Custom Bracket, Pro E model. I like it. I can swivel the camera between landscape and portrait orientation easily and quickly while the flash remains stable above the lens, high enough. The bracket is made very well and comfortable to hold and use. I do use a cord. I will say that one thing that tends to occur with on camera flash, or above lens flash, is, depending on the pose of the subject, and your position, there can be reflections on the teeth and cheeks which need a little post attention. Eye glasses can be a real problem needing a lot of post attention.
    "The mind is its own place and in itself, can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven" - John Milton, Paradise Lost
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