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Thread: Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

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    Default Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

    Has anyone here tried using the Nikon 28mm or 35mm perspective control (tilt/shift) lens on an Olympus DSLR?
    E-510 IR 665nm, 14-42mm II, 40-150mm II

    OM-D E-M1 +
    14-54mm II

    Body Cap Lens 15mm f/8 & 9mm f/8 "fisheye"


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    Default Re: Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

    I've used the 35mm PC lens on the E-3 and it functions but to little purpose because 35mm is a short tele on the 4/3 format rather than a wide angle as it is in its native format.

    I've tried many Nikon and Leica lenses on the 4/3 format and the only ones I've liked the results from have been macro lenses.
    Good shooting,
    English Bob

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    Default Re: Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

    but to little purpose because 35mm is a short tele on the 4/3 format
    Yep, not much point. My OM TS's are sitting in the drawer until I can come up with the pesos for a full frame body.
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    Comments/criticisms are just my personal opinion and are meant to be constructive. Please feel free to do the same for me.


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    Default Re: Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

    The Nikkor 28mm and 35mm PC lenses are probably my 2 most commonly used lenses, with both my E-30 and my E-500. Probably well over half my images are take with one of these 2 lenses. Of course, these are the old manual shift lenses only (no tilt). The image quality is higher from the 35mm but I like the additional room that the 28mm gives. I'd love it if one of them had tilt... but alas, it is not to be. If you are interested in knowing something something specific about them, let me know.
    Wes Clavey
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    Default Re: Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

    Quote Originally Posted by wclavey View Post
    The Nikkor 28mm and 35mm PC lenses are probably my 2 most commonly used lenses, with both my E-30 and my E-500. Probably well over half my images are take with one of these 2 lenses. Of course, these are the old manual shift lenses only (no tilt). The image quality is higher from the 35mm but I like the additional room that the 28mm gives. I'd love it if one of them had tilt... but alas, it is not to be. If you are interested in knowing something something specific about them, let me know.
    I shoot mostly landscapes/seascapes and Victorian architecture, etc. My E-500 is "full spectrum" so I always use the histogram and "test shot" to get the exposure right.
    I also have an external viewfinder to aim the camera when i'm using the very dark infrared filters.
    In the case of the Nikon 35mm lens, I could take a couple of shots for a "panorama". I am mostly concerned about the distortion I'm getting with my current wide-angle lens.
    E-510 IR 665nm, 14-42mm II, 40-150mm II

    OM-D E-M1 +
    14-54mm II

    Body Cap Lens 15mm f/8 & 9mm f/8 "fisheye"


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Tilt-Shift Lenses on 4/3rds

    My first combination was the E-500 + 35mm PC... I shoot mostly landscapes, decaying architecture, cemeteries, etc., and having the PC was a great improvement over my other methods which always introduced WA distortions or PoV distortions. I like it when parallel lines are parallel. And I have found that even just a bit of shift can be handy in regular composing, even if it is not a shot that specifically requires it. When I am out on a photo expedition, as my wife calls them, I shoot entirely from a tripod, and being an ex-LF photographer, the slower pace of metering, composing, shifting, manual stop-down, etc. is fine with e - - it is still faster than it was with the 4x5. But when I am taking pictures as part of a regular family vacation trip, I use one of the regular Olympus digital lenses (9-18, 14-54 or 50-200).

    I found that combining the PC lenses with a magnifying eye-cup and replacing the original E-500 screen with the Katz-Eye with the split image focusing prism really worked well. On the E-30, I simply use live view and an old WL finder from one of my 6x6 SLRs as a focusing aid here in the bright TX sun. About the only problem I ever have is some chromic aberration at some angles to the sun if the sun is really bright and the scene has high contrast, but to be honest, it was worse with another more expensive PC lens (Schneider PC-Super-Angulon) I used before I got these two.

    I have used the shift function a few times to do panoramas, but I more often do that with the rotating tripod head method. I have never used them together with an IR filter... I can't imaging composing and focusing.
    Wes Clavey
    Visit My Gallery

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