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Thread: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

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    Default Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    I've had the Epson 3800 since 2007 and I'm still loving it, but wanted to print some images larger than the 17x22 cut sheet limit. You can't use a roll of paper, there is no way to mount it and no provision in the firmware to stop it from spooling the whole roll after the print is done. After some digging, I found that you can print up to 17x37.48 inches with the RIP functions built into the 3800 and could, if you could afford the price of third-party RIP software, go longer than the almost 38" limit. That being the case, I bought a roll of Ilford Smooth Pearl paper 17" x 100' which was on sale for $56 at my favourite camera store in Victoria BC to give it a try.

    After making a jig to ensure a square cut on the ends of the new "sheets", I gave it a try with a few images. I am in love again! 17 x 38 is a nice size for panoramas and images that lend themselves to being tall and skinny, like giraffes for example. Mounting and framing is going to be interesting though.

    An added benefit to using roll paper is that it is less expensive than buying cut sheets, so it looks like a win-win.

    The Ilford Smooth Pearl is very nice paper, not super glossy and more vibrant than a mat finish paper.
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    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Hey John,

    That's good to know. I'd be interested in seeing the end results, too.

    Thanks,

    Ann
    Appreciate what we have, instead of worrying about what we haven't. Enjoy what is, before it isn't.
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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    I'd love to show you, but taking a picture of a print just wouldn't do it.

    I was very pleased to see that the 10mp images from my e3 hold up to that amount of enlargement, but the originals have to be very sharp and clean. Things that would print out at 13 x 19 may not go the distance to 17 x 38.
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    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    I'll bet you'd be surprised. We you wanting a larger size anyway?
    Well, I thought if you took a picture of it laying next to the printer...?

    Ann
    Appreciate what we have, instead of worrying about what we haven't. Enjoy what is, before it isn't.
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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Quote Originally Posted by AnnF View Post
    I'll bet you'd be surprised. We you wanting a larger size anyway?
    Well, I thought if you took a picture of it laying next to the printer...?

    Ann
    I'll give that a try as soon as I can get away from my current home improvement project.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________________ ​
    ​John Nicklin

    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Gidday John

    I really like what I get out of my R3880 too.

    Recently I picked an A2 size cutting board out of a rubbish skip - I just need some roll paper to use it on.

    I agree about the image being absolutely terrific technically. If it is, I can print to A2 from my E-1 files. I also like Ilford Smooth Pearl a lot. Lovely paper. I thought of trying out some Ilford Gold Silk Rag, but it looks to be far too warm for my liking. I do like to achieve colour accuracy as best I am able.
    Last edited by John King; 08-31-2013 at 04:39 PM. Reason: spelling mistake - doh!
    regards, john from Melbourne, Australia

    Galleries: http://canopuscomputing.com.au/gallery2/v/main-page/

    Olympus dSLRs: E-M1; E-30; E-510; E-1
    ZD lenses: 14-42 EZ; 12-50; f2.8/25 pancake; f2/50 macro; 7~14; 11~22; 14~42; 14~45; 14~54 MkII; 40~150 MkI; 40~150 MkII; 50~200 MkI; EX-25; EC-14
    Accessories: 3x Studio strobe kit; R3880; V700; Minolta ScanElite 5400 II; FL-36R; Sunpak MX-124; OM to 4/3rds adapters
    And a whole swag of film gear and computer stuff. Very fortunate, really.


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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    Gidday John

    I really like what I get out of my R3880 too.

    Recently I picked an A2 size cutting board out of a rubbish skip - I just need some roll paper to use it on.

    I agree about the image being absolutely terrific technically. If it is, I can print to A2 from my E-1 files. I alos like Ilford Smooth Pearl a lot. Lovely paper. I thought of trying out some Ilford Gold Silk Rag, but it looks to be far too warm for my liking. I do like to achieve colour accuracy as best I am able.

    Gidday to you John.

    The Smooth Pearl is nice and white, so it doesn't effect colours the way a warmer paper might. I found the best colour output, using LR4, is achieved if I use the ICC data from Ilford and let LR4 manage the rest in "Relative" mode. Just have to remember to turn off all colour control in the page setup for the printer. If you have figured out a better setup, I'd be interested to know.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________________ ​
    ​John Nicklin

    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
    www.jnicklin.ca | flicker | SmugMug | Blog

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    Default Bit Off Topic... But..... Good News... Ilford Opens US Lab... See links

    Quote Originally Posted by jnicklin View Post
    I've had the Epson 3800 since 2007 and I'm still loving it, but wanted to print some images larger than the 17x22 cut sheet limit. You can't use a roll of paper, there is no way to mount it and no provision in the firmware to stop it from spooling the whole roll after the print is done. After some digging, I found that you can print up to 17x37.48 inches with the RIP functions built into the 3800 and could, if you could afford the price of third-party RIP software, go longer than the almost 38" limit. That being the case, I bought a roll of Ilford Smooth Pearl paper 17" x 100' which was on sale for $56 at my favourite camera store in Victoria BC to give it a try.

    After making a jig to ensure a square cut on the ends of the new "sheets", I gave it a try with a few images. I am in love again! 17 x 38 is a nice size for panoramas and images that lend themselves to being tall and skinny, like giraffes for example. Mounting and framing is going to be interesting though.

    An added benefit to using roll paper is that it is less expensive than buying cut sheets, so it looks like a win-win.

    The Ilford Smooth Pearl is very nice paper, not super glossy and more vibrant than a mat finish paper.
    Film afficianados in the US will be happy to hear that Ilford has opened a Lab in the USA.

    Link to post on Photo.Net:

    Ilford lab USA now open for business - Photo.net B&W Photo - Film & Processing Forum

    Link to the Ilford web site in San Clemente CA. USA:

    Welcome to the ILFORD Lab Direct website - Black and white photo prints | Silver Gelatin prints | Black and white film processing prints | Black and White Prints from Film | Black and White Prints from Digital | Ilford Lab | Film processing lab

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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Gidday John

    Quote Originally Posted by jnicklin View Post
    Gidday to you John.

    The Smooth Pearl is nice and white, so it doesn't effect colours the way a warmer paper might. I found the best colour output, using LR4, is achieved if I use the ICC data from Ilford and let LR4 manage the rest in "Relative" mode. Just have to remember to turn off all colour control in the page setup for the printer. If you have figured out a better setup, I'd be interested to know.
    I also appreciate the Smooth Pearl for that neutral paper colour. I was really rapt in the idea of the Gold Silk Rag until I saw its yellowish colour cast. Ilford Smooth Gloss has a slightly greenish cast that I find unattractive too.

    The Canson papers appear to be very good, and I must get a sample pack of them to try. I have put a sheet of their gloss through the R3880, and it was excellent. I picked up a couple of A4 packets of Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper a few weeks ago, but have yet to try it.

    You are spot on about the colour management IMO. It can't be stressed enough that one simply has to use the proper profile for the paper and your printer, and turn off all colour management at the printer driver side of things. If you don't do this latter, your editing program will send CMYK to the printer driver; the printer driver is expecting RGB, so will convert it back to RGB, then re-convert it to CMYK. The result is "mud" ...

    I think that the R3880 can handle paper up to just under a metre long without any hacks being done to it. As you rightly point out, the secret is to get the ends exactly square, or the printer throws a hissy fit!
    regards, john from Melbourne, Australia

    Galleries: http://canopuscomputing.com.au/gallery2/v/main-page/

    Olympus dSLRs: E-M1; E-30; E-510; E-1
    ZD lenses: 14-42 EZ; 12-50; f2.8/25 pancake; f2/50 macro; 7~14; 11~22; 14~42; 14~45; 14~54 MkII; 40~150 MkI; 40~150 MkII; 50~200 MkI; EX-25; EC-14
    Accessories: 3x Studio strobe kit; R3880; V700; Minolta ScanElite 5400 II; FL-36R; Sunpak MX-124; OM to 4/3rds adapters
    And a whole swag of film gear and computer stuff. Very fortunate, really.


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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    I presume a "Hissy" is one of those wild and paradoxical features that landed and only developed in your part of the world. I just saw a wonderful PBS broadcast about the "Birds of Paradise". Pretty incredible.

    My dad taught me all I needed to know about tracking and hunting (which I changed to photographing) all the wonderful wildlife in the PNW US region where I grew up, but while he often spoke of "Hissy Fits", he never showed me pictures of them, nor how to find them. I've shot (photographically speaking) bears, deer, elk, moose, wolves, and all sorts of flying and swimming creatures. However, please tell me.... If I were to confront a Hissy and enrage one, would I want to be on the receiving end of a "Hissy Fit". Does one often survive these "fits"?

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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    ^

    Yeah. One of them ...
    regards, john from Melbourne, Australia

    Galleries: http://canopuscomputing.com.au/gallery2/v/main-page/

    Olympus dSLRs: E-M1; E-30; E-510; E-1
    ZD lenses: 14-42 EZ; 12-50; f2.8/25 pancake; f2/50 macro; 7~14; 11~22; 14~42; 14~45; 14~54 MkII; 40~150 MkI; 40~150 MkII; 50~200 MkI; EX-25; EC-14
    Accessories: 3x Studio strobe kit; R3880; V700; Minolta ScanElite 5400 II; FL-36R; Sunpak MX-124; OM to 4/3rds adapters
    And a whole swag of film gear and computer stuff. Very fortunate, really.


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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    Gidday John

    I think that the R3880 can handle paper up to just under a metre long without any hacks being done to it. As you rightly point out, the secret is to get the ends exactly square, or the printer throws a hissy fit!
    I believe the 3880 is the same as the 3800 in regards to paper length being restricted to 950 mm (37.4 inches more or less) unless you want to spend big money on a third party RIP setup. In practice, I'm finding the 950 mm length to be just about as big as I'd want to print anyway given the width restriction.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________________ ​
    ​John Nicklin

    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
    www.jnicklin.ca | flicker | SmugMug | Blog

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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    True enough, John. IIRC, the 3880 and 3800 are identical in that regard.

    I originally chose the R3880 because it gives the best quality printing of all the bigger Epsons. The R4880 has the roll feed, but I could not even start to justify the price difference, and it uses a droplet size about double that of the R3880/3800, IIRC.
    regards, john from Melbourne, Australia

    Galleries: http://canopuscomputing.com.au/gallery2/v/main-page/

    Olympus dSLRs: E-M1; E-30; E-510; E-1
    ZD lenses: 14-42 EZ; 12-50; f2.8/25 pancake; f2/50 macro; 7~14; 11~22; 14~42; 14~45; 14~54 MkII; 40~150 MkI; 40~150 MkII; 50~200 MkI; EX-25; EC-14
    Accessories: 3x Studio strobe kit; R3880; V700; Minolta ScanElite 5400 II; FL-36R; Sunpak MX-124; OM to 4/3rds adapters
    And a whole swag of film gear and computer stuff. Very fortunate, really.


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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Quote Originally Posted by John King View Post
    True enough, John. IIRC, the 3880 and 3800 are identical in that regard.

    I originally chose the R3880 because it gives the best quality printing of all the bigger Epsons. The R4880 has the roll feed, but I could not even start to justify the price difference, and it uses a droplet size about double that of the R3880/3800, IIRC.
    I bought the 3800 before the 3880 was available, aside from the Vivid Magenta inks, they appear to be pretty much the same. Like you, I couldn't justify the 4800 (at the time) the extra cost and the size made it difficult. Overall, I'm still impressed by the beast, even if it doesn't have a roll feeder.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________________ ​
    ​John Nicklin

    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Do your printers use the 80ml ink cartridge size? How often do you have to print to keep the nozzles from plugging and having to run clean cycles? Any widely based estimates on how often you have to replace cartridges?
    Clint
    OM-D EM-1 | 7-14mm | 12-40mm | 12-60mm | 35-100mm | 50-200mm | 100-400mm | 12mm | 25mm f/1.4 | 45mm f/1.8 | 75mm f/1.8 | FL-600R | FL-50R |

    Shooting since 1964

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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Gidday Clint

    Mine - R3880 - has 9x 80ml cartridges. However, only one of the full black cartridges, either GLOSS or MATT, is in use at any given time. Changing between the two costs quite a lot of ink as the lines between the cartridge and the print head has to be purged. The "gloss" and "matt" doesn't actually refer to the paper type. Some gloss papers require the gloss ink, some require the matt ink. Ditto with other paper types. It pays to keep this in mind when buying papers.

    The main differences between the R3800 and R3880 are the use of Vivid Magenta/Light Magenta in the R3880 and the colour lookup table is different. This gives the R3880 a wider colour gamut and slightly higher dynamic range according to those who measure such things.

    I have left mine for over 6 months on one occasion without the print head nozzles clogging (don't ask - it's a long story ... ). However, I did have to remove and re-seat one of the black cartridges to get the printer to recognise it properly. After that was sorted out, I removed each cartridge and gave it a gentle agitate, just as a precaution.

    My first set of cartridges are still in use. I probably print more A4 prints than A2.
    There is a once only hit of around 20% of the capacity of the cartridges to charge the lines between the cartridges and the print head when the printer is first put into service, so the second and subsequent cartridges give more yield than the first set. Cartridges can be replaced individually, unlike with some other printers.
    When I do need to buy a new set, Adorama appear to have the best prices including shipping to Oz. The full set from Adorama costs a bit more than half what they do here !

    The R3880 is a brilliant printer IMNSHO.

    Hope this helps.
    regards, john from Melbourne, Australia

    Galleries: http://canopuscomputing.com.au/gallery2/v/main-page/

    Olympus dSLRs: E-M1; E-30; E-510; E-1
    ZD lenses: 14-42 EZ; 12-50; f2.8/25 pancake; f2/50 macro; 7~14; 11~22; 14~42; 14~45; 14~54 MkII; 40~150 MkI; 40~150 MkII; 50~200 MkI; EX-25; EC-14
    Accessories: 3x Studio strobe kit; R3880; V700; Minolta ScanElite 5400 II; FL-36R; Sunpak MX-124; OM to 4/3rds adapters
    And a whole swag of film gear and computer stuff. Very fortunate, really.


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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Like John's 3880, my 3800 uses the 80ml cartridges. They last a long time and are much more economical than the smaller cartridges in the lower numbered printers. I have replaced all of the cartridges since I got it in 2007. I seem to go through more of the blacks and the blue than any of the others. I've lost track of the number of cartridges I've used, but its not that many for the number of prints I've made, especially since I consider 11x14 to be on the small size. I go through boxes of 13x19 paper (50 sheets to the box) and have no complaints about the ink cost.

    Like John, I have left the printer dormant for up to 6 months at a time, I have never had the unrecognized cartridge problem though. When I haven't used it for more than a month, I just do a power clean cycle and everything is fine. I have a small HP printer that needs to be kicked in the head(s) once a week to keep it from clogging up.

    These printers are definitely pro quality, both in output and build, very reliable.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________________ ​
    ​John Nicklin

    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
    www.jnicklin.ca | flicker | SmugMug | Blog

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    Default Re: Printing BIG (well fairly big anyway)

    Should add that on the older models where you had to physically change the black matte and gloss cartridges, you could waste about $30 worth of ink making the changeover. While we do lose some ink in the 3800/3880 models making the change, it's nowhere near that expensive, but it's still very wise to make sure that you don't choose the wrong paper type and accidentally have to make the switch twice, that adds up.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________________ ​
    ​John Nicklin

    e3, ZD 11-22, ZD 12-60, Sigma 70-200, EC14, FL50R, 5DMkIII, 24-105 L, 70-200 f4 L, RB67, OM1, B&J 8x10, 5DIII, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f4 L, 100D.
    www.jnicklin.ca | flicker | SmugMug | Blog

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