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Thread: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

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    Default EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    So, Michael Reichmann over at LL is back from his bi-annual Antarctic trip. This year, all he took with him was the EM-1, and two FT lenses (12-60mm and 50-200mm). Well, even though he loves the lenses, this is what he had to say:


    Truth be told though, while these lenses, and others in the original Olympus Four Thirds High Grade and Super High Grade family are some of the best lenses ever, they have their flaws. Not optical, but with regard to autofocus. For day-to-day use in normal light they are fine, but in low light and low contrast conditions the AF simply doesn't work all that well. It hunts. It misses, and often it simply gives up. People shooting beside me with Nikons and Canons were nailing focus of penguins porpoising and whales sounding, but I was left standing there with my lenses racking back and forth. I switched to manual focus with Peaking, but while better than nothing it just wasn't quick enough for fast action wildlife shooting. The OMD-1 is a step in the right direction, but now it's time to simply do better when it comes to AF.

    Not exactly a resounding endorsement.

    Of course, according to our resident EM-1 expert on this forum, the camera's perfect and it's the no-talent photographer that's the problem here....idiot should have manually focused all week.

    Link is here: Michaels Antarctica 2014

    Leigh
    zippski
    Last edited by zippski; 02-05-2014 at 08:24 PM.

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by zippski View Post
    So, Michael Reichmann over at LL is back from his bi-annual Antarctic trip. This year, all he took with him was the EM-1, and two FT lenses (12-60mm and 50-200mm). Well, even though he loves the lenses, this is what he had to say:


    Truth be told though, while these lenses, and others in the original Olympus Four Thirds High Grade and Super High Grade family are some of the best lenses ever, they have their flaws. Not optical, but with regard to autofocus. For day-to-day use in normal light they are fine, but in low light and low contrast conditions the AF simply doesn't work all that well. It hunts. It misses, and often it simply gives up. People shooting beside me with Nikons and Canons were nailing focus of penguins porpoising and whales sounding, but I was left standing there with my lenses racking back and forth. I switched to manual focus with Peaking, but while better than nothing it just wasn't quick enough for fast action wildlife shooting. The OMD-1 is a step in the right direction, but now it's time to simply do better when it comes to AF.

    Not exactly a resounding endorsement.

    Of course, according to our resident EM-1 expert on this forum, the camera's perfect and it's the no-talent photographer that's the problem here....idiot should have manually focused all week.

    Link is here: Michaels Antarctica 2014

    Leigh
    zippski
    We could have told him so and save the embarrassment.
    I was testing the 150mmF2 against the m4/375-300mm at 150mm today. It was dull conditions but not fast subjects, single shot. The 150mm only momentarily hunted, and focused acceptably quickly. But the M4/3 lens was very noticeable faster. Where I really noticed the lag was after focus was achieved. The 150mm seemed to take ages to fire after pressing the button. That's a slight exaggeration of course, but a frustration.
    Don

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    I've been using my E-M1 with the 14-54mm II lens, for 2 months now,
    photographing inside museums in available light and with a tripod,
    and have had absolutely no problems with focusing whatsoever.
    E-510 IR 665nm, 14-42mm II, 40-150mm II

    OM-D E-M1 +
    14-54mm II

    Body Cap Lens 15mm f/8 & 9mm f/8 "fisheye"


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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    I can imagine lots of smooth surfaces, not a good match for the AF sensors. Isn't that why they made cross point sensors?

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Gee....I thought all you had to do was "tip the EM-1 camera at a slight angle" to effortlessly lock focus ;-))

    Leigh
    zippski

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    I am sorry to say that this is getting just childish. This is not the place for personal vendettas.

    Please, grow up
    flickr | "God made the integers; all else is the work of man" - Leopold Kronecker

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    I have wanted to do this Antarctica XXI trip for YEARS! Alas, for two people its $22,000 (and that's just out of Punta Arenas, have to add $3000-4000 for two to get there and back), which is what our last 4 month trip around the world cost.

    Hmmm... 7 days in Antarctica or 4 months around the world...
    Olympus OM-D EM-5
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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by Edmunds View Post
    I have wanted to do this Antarctica XXI trip for YEARS! Alas, for two people its $22,000 (and that's just out of Punta Arenas, have to add $3000-4000 for two to get there and back), which is what our last 4 month trip around the world cost.

    Hmmm... 7 days in Antarctica or 4 months around the world...
    I too would love to go on a trip like this. But it is way too expensive.
    flickr | "God made the integers; all else is the work of man" - Leopold Kronecker

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    If you want an excellent wildlife viewing trip that is as good as Antarctica, I can recommend the Galapagos islands. Several people on our ship who had been to both said the experiences were rather similar, while the landscapes are different the animals just the same have no idea what humans are and you really have to watch your step! (no really) Plus, the weather is warm and nice, and there are more activities, such as snorkeling with turtles and sharks. Its about $1000/day for a couple on a ship that takes you island to island, but 4 days is good enough.

    Also, coming from Northern Europe I am not sure we would find the antarctic landscapes to be quite as dramatic as everyone makes it out to be. I have a lot of travel experience, and I find people who pay five figures for a cruise have a tendency to post-trip hype it up, more for themselves than others.
    Olympus OM-D EM-5
    12mm f/2.0 - 17mm f/1.8 - 25mm f/1.4 - 60mm f/2.8 macro - 75-300mm f/4.8-6.7
    - FL36R

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    I would like to see the Galapagos islands too; so that sounds like a more reasonable trip.

    I think you are right about how I will think about the Antartic landscape; also it is much cheaper for me to go to Svalbard which are very similar, landscape wise. No penguins though
    flickr | "God made the integers; all else is the work of man" - Leopold Kronecker

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ned View Post
    I can imagine lots of smooth surfaces, not a good match for the AF sensors. Isn't that why they made cross point sensors?
    A cross-point sensor will not help you when there are shiny surfaces. The AF sensors lock on lines with a high contrast difference. The original AF sensors were only vertical , so they worked with horisontal lines. A cross point sensor will also work with vertical lines.

    I have read somewhere that the sensor PDAF pixels are horisontal not vertical; that can explain some of the issues we see with the 50-200mm.
    flickr | "God made the integers; all else is the work of man" - Leopold Kronecker

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    You'd think a person as knowledgeable as Michael would have tested his gear beforehand ...

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by beameup View Post
    I've been using my E-M1 with the 14-54mm II lens, for 2 months now,
    photographing inside museums in available light and with a tripod,
    and have had absolutely no problems with focusing whatsoever.
    true, but no comparison to shooting fast moving action under harsh enviromental lighting.

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by tomsi42 View Post
    I am sorry to say that this is getting just childish. This is not the place for personal vendettas.

    Please, grow up
    I don't think this is childish and certainly not a vendetta-
    More of these kinds of posts are needed to inject a note of
    humor now and then- On so many sites the replies tend to become way
    too clinical - As I am told on other sites 'no one has to read it'-
    I don't think anyone will get their nose out of joint-
    Monty
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    µ4/3 ◙ OMD E-M5♠ E-PL5♣ MMF-3 12-50 40-150R 14-150 75-300MkII -- 4/3 ◙ Good ol' E-1☺ 14-42 40-150 14-54MkII

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by dh202 View Post
    You'd think a person as knowledgeable as Michael would have tested his gear beforehand ...
    Maybe he made the mistake of believing the hype? It's hard to avoid sometimes.

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by Fishtug View Post
    I don't think this is childish and certainly not a vendetta-
    If it only had been so well - the bad mouthing between a few members are getting tiring. I felt the post wasn't directed to Mike at LL, but one of the other members.
    flickr | "God made the integers; all else is the work of man" - Leopold Kronecker

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by dh202 View Post
    You'd think a person as knowledgeable as Michael would have tested his gear beforehand ...
    Not sure if he had the time. I am currently borrowing a E-M1 and testing it with my 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5II, 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5, 25mm f/2.8 and 75-300mm f/4-5.6.

    The results are very varying, but I am not sure if I can draw any conclusions yet.
    flickr | "God made the integers; all else is the work of man" - Leopold Kronecker

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    As always: horses for courses. I like this fellow's set, taken with the E-M1+150/2.0 using CAF in crappy indoor arena light. Nope, no icebergs.

    Photo Fix: Supercross from the Stands – Anaheim 3

    Cheers,

    Rick

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by tomsi42 View Post
    I too would love to go on a trip like this. But it is way too expensive.
    and way too cold.

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Back from our ski vacation. I had some time to play around more with the E-M1 with the 14-54 II on it, and compare it to a D-600 with the 60mm/2.8 macro. In good light, the E-M1 combo is, well... livable, still not great, but OK. The darker it got the longer it needed, which was to be expected. The Nik smoked it all the way, silent, fast, and right on.
    So my feeling is, after having the E-M1 for a few weeks now, is that it is a great little camera, and might rock with mFT lenses on it, but it is on the lame side with FT lenses. They just need lots of light and good, high contrast subjects to not be aggravatingly slow or failing to focus all together.
    M.R. should have done his homework, simple as that. Maybe he just believed what we were told by the Oly people about how well the FT lenses would work on the E-M1, or he had some other intensive to do something like that. I certainly wouldn't want to "try out" an un-proven system on an expensive trip like that.

    As to the other.... give it a rest....please!

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    Default Re: EM-1 Fail: Must Be the Photographer

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Bradley View Post
    So my feeling is, after having the E-M1 for a few weeks now, is that it is a great little camera, and might rock with mFT lenses on it, but it is on the lame side with FT lenses. They just need lots of light and good, high contrast subjects to not be aggravatingly slow or failing to focus all together.
    M.R. should have done his homework, simple as that. Maybe he just believed what we were told by the Oly people about how well the FT lenses would work on the E-M1, or he had some other intensive to do something like that. I certainly wouldn't want to "try out" an un-proven system on an expensive trip like that.

    As to the other.... give it a rest....please!
    +1...

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