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Thread: Orion Nebula

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    Default Orion Nebula

    Trying out something new...10 shot stack of 1 sec 6400 iso shots of the Nebula.

    We need Daniel B. to go out with his scope and do this, as this is roughly cropped in 50% on my 200mm f4. lens @f5.6


    Last edited by doofclenas; 03-04-2014 at 07:50 PM.
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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    That is pretty impressive. Nice lens. Stacking really works! What did you use to stack?
    I would love to try, but the nights where we can even SEE Orion are few and far between around here. I decided to leave the heavy astro work to the big guys who live in the mountains.

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    Used photoshop to stack. As mentioned, I had to manually align the layers by zooming in to three bright stars, and using one layer as my guide, and aligning each one to it. Took about 20 min to do 10 layers.
    Clint
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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    Try CombineZM. It is free and is also great for macro focus stacking. It will do 10 frames like that in a couple of minutes, fully automatically. The astro-jocks use RegiStax, but I find it harder to use, even though the results are perhaps better than CombineZM.

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    Are those Mac OS?

    I'm testing nebulosity 3, but I think I need to be a nasa engineer to figure out the interface.
    Clint
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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    Nice. I use to be a member at Cloudy Nights forum and always wanted to get into astrophotography until I determined how time consuming it could be.


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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    And how EXPENSIVE!

    Not sure about CombineZ for mac. Have to check. I run a PC.

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    I figure I might be able to find an inexpensive m42 300mm version to adapt to the em1 for some interesting astro stuff.
    Clint
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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    If you are going to do that, why not just get a nice little 600mm refractor?

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    Any suggestions that won't break the bank?
    Clint
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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    SkyWatcher 80/600mm doublet refractor. Have a look here:
    http://forum.fourthirdsphoto.com/pho...tml#post630809

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    For anyone who is really interested in getting into astro-photography, consider this: It's pretty much all about aperture. Most people who photograph nebulae, star-clusters, galaxies, etc., do not use a refractor (lens system). Instead, because the same money will buy a reflector or mirror system with a much wider aperture and hence of much greater light-gathering capacity, that's the way to go. Check out astronomy magazines such as Astronomy or Sky & Telescope for mirror systems (either Newtonian or Schmidt-Cassegrain reflectors), instead of lens, and see what I mean. --Much greater "bang for the buck."
    ~Ken

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    True. Much bigger bag for the back too!

    Schmidt-Cassegrain are also very popular with Astrophotographers, and a lot more compact than Newtonians.

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    Not want to spend a ton of money, I wonder how good these would be to start out? I figure once the kids get a little older (3 and 6 right now) it may come in handy.

    http://www.telescopes.com/telescopes...qreflector.cfm

    or

    http://www.telescopes.com/telescopes...qreflector.cfm



    Quote Originally Posted by kmont View Post
    For anyone who is really interested in getting into astro-photography, consider this: It's pretty much all about aperture. Most people who photograph nebulae, star-clusters, galaxies, etc., do not use a refractor (lens system). Instead, because the same money will buy a reflector or mirror system with a much wider aperture and hence of much greater light-gathering capacity, that's the way to go. Check out astronomy magazines such as Astronomy or Sky & Telescope for mirror systems (either Newtonian or Schmidt-Cassegrain reflectors), instead of lens, and see what I mean. --Much greater "bang for the buck."
    ~Ken
    Clint
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    Olympus EM-1, E-PM2, LX-7, S110
    7.5, 12-32, 12-40, 14-42, 20, 25, 45, 75
    Asahi 35 2, SMC Super Tak 135 2.5, Super Tak 200 4
    HLD-7, FL-600r, FL-36r, FL-36, Cactus V5 Duo (x2)

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    Default Re: Orion Nebula

    My instinct would be to go with the brighter 130mm one (still dark!) as you already have a 2x crop sensor. I am sure they are not bad. But with telescdopes, you really get what you pay for. I would always go for better quality used than not so good new, but then again, I do not have any experience with these scopes. There is an saying, something like, the heavens open up at 8", meaning the light gathering of an 8" (200mm) Newtonian makes it possible to see all kinds of things that you can't see with a 6" (150mm). Depends also on what you want to see. Moon and planets? That you can do with a refractor a swell.
    I had a really nice 8" Newt for a while, and it was fine for looking, but crappy for birds! Little difficult to hand hold.

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